Month: February 2019

Alipay updates anti-fraud functionsscans a quick response

Alipay, the country’s top mobile payment platform, announced on Tuesday a major anti-fraud u

pgrade on its application by teaming up with 26 public security departments nationwide.

The new function, dubbed “Security Guard”, allows users to set up related accounts among f

amily members or close friends. Should any abnormalities on transactions occur, the system would send

out alerts to all related accounts in order to prevent the fraud from materializing and minimize loss of funds.

“Security is the lifeline of Alipay, and we hope to fight fraud in a manner as harsh as dru

nk driving,” said Rui Xiongwen, vice-president of Ant Financial, Alipay’s parent company.

Alipay users can choose to delay payment for two hours or 24 hours and raise an alert

on the platform if they deem such transactions potentially misdirected or fraudulent.

The system has been linked to local public security authorities to help freeze any transaction

s in doubt. The money will be credited back to the user’s account if authorities determine fraud has been committed.

A number of local anti-fraud centers in cities like Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhe

n also pledged to cooperate with Alipay on financial security education and anti-fraud alarming systems.

moefantasy.cn

Trade talks expected to finalize dealNG SHUIYU,ZHONG NA

China and the United States are expected to come to an agreement soon over trade frictions, analysts said, as the negotiating teams a

re reported to be discussing the wording of an accord and considering applying the brakes to their tariff standoff.

They made the prediction after Chinese and US officials said there had been concrete p

rogress on multiple issues in the latest round of trade talks in Washington.

During the latest talks, held from Thursday to Sunday in Washington, the seventh round since February of last year, th

e two sides focused on the text of an agreement, the Chinese delegation said, according to a Xinhua News Agency report.

The negotiators also had made substantial progress on such specific issues as technology transfers, protection of i

ntellectual property rights, nontariff barriers, the service industry, agriculture and exchange rates, the delegation said.

On the basis of the latest progress, the two sides are expected to continue their work

into the next stage, in accordance with the instructions of the two countries’ top leaders, according to Xinhua.

youhuileyuan.cn

It’s all about Huawei. World’s biggest mobile tech show g

  Over the next four days, about 100,000 people in Barcelona are expected to traipse through the halls of Mobile Worl

d Congress, one of the tech industry’s biggest events. All the biggest players in the world use it to showcase new products.

  One company really stands out this year: China’s Huawei. Walking

out of the Barcelona airport, there’s a Huawei hospitality stand. The company’s bran

ding dots the city. The lanyards conference attendees wear around their necks are decorated with the Huawei name.

  There’s a good reason everyone is focused on Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecom equipment.

  Huawei is a crucial part of China’s efforts to advance superfast 5G wir

eless networks and today is caught in a life or death battle with the US government.

  The United States claims that Huawei poses a potential national security threat. Last month, US prosecutors revealed cri

minal charges against the company, alleging that Huawei stole trade secrets and worked to skirt US sanctions on Iran.

sjhtjn.cn

DPRK leader leaves Pyongyang for Hanoi for second DPRK

PYONGYANG — Kim Jong-un, top leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), left here Saturday afternoon by train f

or Vietnamese capital Hanoi for the second DPRK-US summit, the official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported Sunday.

Kim will meet with US President Donald Trump there on Feb 27-28. Their first meetin

g was held in June 2018 in Singapore, which resulted in improved bilateral relations.

Kim will pay an official visit to Vietnam at the invitation of Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong before his meeting with Trump.

Kim was accompanied by Kim Yong-chol, Ri Su-yong, Kim Phyong-hae and O Su-yong, members of th

e Political Bureau and vice-chairmen of the Central Committee of the Workers’ Party of K

orea (WPK), Ri Yong-ho, member of the Political Bureau of the WPK Central Com

mittee and foreign minister, No Kwang-chol, alternate member of the Po

litical Bureau of the WPK Central Committee and minister of the People’s Armed Forces, among others, said the KCNA.

Kim was seen off at Pyongyang Railway Station by Kim Yong-nam, Choe Ryong-hae and Pak Pong-ju, members of the Presidium of the Political Bureau of the Cen

tral Committee of the WPK, and other senior officials of the party, government and armed forces, said the KCNA.

headun.cn

Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

qianpadat.com

But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in

  But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in May 2018 when President Donald Tr

ump pulled the United States out of the nuclear deal. Despite repeated certifications that Iran was

sticking to its end of the bargain, Trump unleashed several rounds of stinging sanctions on the country.

  The US president said the penalties aimed to force Iran to end its military adventurism in the region, a demand that Iranian officials have repeatedly brushed off.

  Officially, the sanctions exempt humanitarian goods, such as food, medicine and medicin

al instruments. But in reality, shortages in essential goods have affected households across the country.

  Ali now gets the medicines to treat his daughter’s rare genetic disease, from friends living abr

oad. Her medical bill has more than doubled, forcing him to sell his car, work two jobs, and accu

mulate loans. He says that his entire salary from his day job as a waiter goes toward Dory’s treatment.

  ”I am a wedding singer at night. I try to stay cheery and

keep a smile on my face, but on the inside all I can think about is my daughter,” says Ali.

www.qianhuain.com

Because of sanctions, Iran’s health sector is struggling to

  keep up with soaring prices of medications and medical instruments, doctors tell CNN.

  European banks, fearing secondary US penalties, are reluctant to do business with Iranian companies even those not blacklisted b

y the US. Medical companies have had to resort to paying intermediaries exorbitant sums to secure ne

eded supplies, including imported medicines and medical instruments which have more than tripled in value du

ring Iran’s rapidly dropping currency, health professionals explain.Sanctions is the first problem in our country and in ou

r system. We can’t transfer the money and make the preparations for surgery. It’s a big problem for us,” says Dr. Mo

hammad Hassan Bani Asad, managing director of the Gandhi Hotel Hospital. “We have the procedures, but we don’t hav

e the instruments. It is very difficult for patients and maybe leads to death of some patients.”

  Though most of Iran’s medicines are domestically manufactured, much of the primary materials, m

any of them imported, are in short supply. And while the state provides universal healthcare, so

me of the treatment needed for critical cases cannot be covered by state insurance.

www.qianpadae.com

Emami recalls a family meeting in which an elderly woman’s

  children decided to go against his advice to discharge their mother with Alzheimer’s disease: “(The children) told me the patient is yours. We don’t have any money to spend on her.”

  ”I explained to the children that when she stays here, it means that her life expectancy is reduced by 80% … it means that she may have an infection and means the lady will die much sooner,” says Emami.Accompanied by her mother, 5-year-ol

d Dory visits Ali at work wearing a tutu skirt and a coat with leopard print. He carries her behind the bar where she pl

ays with empty juice dispensers. Later she settles on his lap and plays games on his smartphone.

  Trump admin pushes for tougher action on Iran, swipes at Europe

  It’s a break from her shuttling between home and the hospital, which she must visit at lea

st once a week. Sometimes the doctors determine that she has to stay in her hospital bed for sev

eral weeks. It’s a routine that will continue until she’s 18-years-old, her father says.

  But Ali says he’s dedicated to helping her have a normal life: “It doesn’t matter what Trump’s sanctions do, I’ll do whatever it takes to find her medication.”

  He puts a hand on his chest, puffing up his skinny frame. “I’ll even fly myself to get them for her. Whatever it takes.”

qianpadbe.com

Woman dies as food poisoning in Michelin-starred restau

  A Michelin-starred restaurant in the Spanish city of Valencia is at the center of a food poisoning outbreak that has killed one woman and affected 28 further diners.

  The 46-year-old victim died after eating a meal at Riff in the Mediterranean coast city. Regional health author

ities have also identified 28 more people that became ill after visiting the restaurant, according to a statement.

  The woman, who has not been identified, died in her home early Sunday morning. Her husband and 12-year-old son also suffered food poisoning but are now

in recovery, said authorities.All of the 29 victims of the outbreak had eaten at Riff between February 13 and 16.

  Food inspectors visited the restaurant on February 18 but did not find any explanat

ion for what could have contributed to the outbreak, reads the statement from the public health department.

  The inspectors took samples of food used in the tasting menu, which have been sent to Spain’s National Toxicology Institute for analysis.

www.qianpadag.com

An archive video report of Trump’s 1996 Moscow trip

  emerged online in late January. The news report — misidentified on You

Tube as dating from 1995 — shows Lorber, Lebow and Trump in discussion with Mo

scow’s then deputy mayor, Vladimir Resin, and his staff, with Geovanis looking on from the background.

  Blocked numbers and ‘dirt’ on Clinton

  Lorber has already been linked to the Senate investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 elections. The New York Times n

amed him earlier this month as one of the Trump family associates who spoke with Donald Trump J

r. from blocked numbers around the time of a highly scrutinized 2016 meeting at Trump Tower in New York.

  That meeting was attended by top Trump campaign advisers –— Trump Jr., the Presid

ent’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, and Manafort — and Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskya, who had pr

omised dirt on Trump’s election opponent, Hillary Clinton. Lorber has not responded to multiple calls for comment.

www.gzbbaf.com